Inside Egypt’s Salafists

Islamists rallying last month In Egypt

Islamists rallying last month In Egypt

 

For those with enough time on their hands, here is an in depth look at Egypt’s fundamentalist Salafi movements.

Written by Stephane Lacroix, an expert on the subject, it examines the electoral success of hardline Islamists and offers some context about the history of Al Nour, the main Salafi party in Egypt.

Given the religious divisions creating fissures at the ballot box, it makes for a fascinating read.

Morsi’s power grab should be no surprise

Muslim Brotherhood supporters and relatives carry the body of 15-year-old Islam Massoud during his funeral in the Egyptian town of Damanhour (photo by REUTERS/Asmaa Waguih)

 

Here is a neat dissection of the current political mess in Egypt, by blogger Nervana Mahmoud.

Published at Al-monitor.com, Mahmoud argues that the crisis was “an inevitable outcome in a country that is still seduced by selfish politics that aim for dominance rather than unity”.

She pushes the point that the Muslim Brotherhood’s modus operandi is partly a result of decades of oppression under successive regimes. Mohamed Morsi, she adds, sees Egypt as a “malfunctioning machine that must be restored back to its factory settings with Islamic instruction”.

Offering a four point analysis of the Brotherhood’s political failings, Mahmoud contends that “pragmatism” and “ambiguity” are used as tools to advance the group’s Islamic agenda.

Many might argue that the Brotherhood is not alone in this. Surely the Tories or Labour in the UK – or their American, European or any other counterparts – are just as capable of exploiting political elusiveness in their search for power? Is it fair to lambast the Brothers on this score?

A nice offering on the debate about what is making the Muslim Brothers tick.